FIELD TRIP TO THE MAPLE SYRUP FESTIVAL AT THE KORTRIGHT CENTRE FOR CONSERVATION

Dear Nile Academy, Family and Friends,

On March 24th 2017, Ms. Aral and Ms. Belir took the Gr. 7 and Gr. 8 students to the Maple Syrup Festival at the Kortright Centre for Conservation. We started the day by having a delicious pancake breakfast with real maple syrup. After being energized, students had a professional tour guide who provided an educational power point presentation on the history of maple syrup and how it’s made. Moreover, she guided students through the maple trail, as she provided interactive and hands-on demonstrations and asked students questions. Moreover, we visited the Maple Shack and had the chance to see the various cauldrons that were boiling the fresh sap from the Sugar Maple trees. Afterwards, students were very eager to go for a hike in the forest, as we held walking sticks and marched into the lush greenery full of trees. The hiking trail led to an incredible boardwalk that had a breathtaking view of serenity and bliss.

Overall, students learned important educational facts about how Ontario is the fourth largest maple syrup producer after Quebec, Vermont and New York. Students understood the historical past of the Aboriginals and how they were the first people to discover maple syrup, which is known as “sinzibuckwud” in Algonquin. The aboriginals valued the sweet sap water that dripped from the Sugar Maple trees in early spring, as they appreciated its nutritional value of vitamins and minerals. Afterwards, the Aboriginals demonstrated to the French settlers how they used tomahawks to make openings in the trees, where wooden reeds are placed , which allows sweet sap water to flow into birch bark buckets, where after hot stones are placed to have excess water vapour away.

Now, in the present time, maple syrup has become a national treasure known as ‘Liquid Gold,’ and is a vital key sweetener in authentic baked goods and meals, such as Maple lattes, donuts, pecan ice-cream, and baked beans. On the whole, students had an intriguing day, as they were inspired about how maple syrup is made, alongside its history. Students will always remember and cherish their memories of enjoying fresh pancakes and hiking in the scenic landscapes of the great Canadian outdoors.

Sincerely,

Ms. Aral (Art Teacher) and Ms. Belir (Social Science Teacher)